Table of Contents

 

 

 

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-Q

 

(Mark One)

 

x

QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the quarterly period ended July 4, 2009

 

 

or

 

 

o

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

 

For the transition period from             to            

 

Commission file number 001-33170

 

 

NETLIST, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

 

95-4812784

State or other jurisdiction of

 

(I.R.S. Employer

incorporation or organization

 

Identification No.)

 

51 Discovery, Irvine, CA 92618

(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

 

(949) 435-0025

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes  x  No  o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (section 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes  o  No  o

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definition of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check One):

 

Large accelerated filer   o

 

Accelerated filer   o

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer   o

 

Smaller reporting company   x

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

 

 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).  Yes  o  No  x

 

The number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock as of the latest practicable date:

 

Common Stock, par value $0.001 per share

 

19,855,411 shares outstanding at July 31, 2009

 

 

 



Table of Contents

 

NETLIST, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

QUARTERLY REPORT ON FORM 10-Q

FOR THE THREE AND SIX MONTHS ENDED JULY 4, 2009

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

Page

PART I.

FINANCIAL INFORMATION

3

Item 1.

Financial Statements

3

 

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets at July 4, 2009 (unaudited) and January 3, 2009 (audited)

3

 

Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Three and Six Months Ended July 4, 2009 and June 28, 2008

4

 

Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Six Months Ended July 4, 2009 and June 28, 2008

5

 

Notes to Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements

6

Item 2.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

20

Item 3.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

32

Item 4.

Controls and Procedures

32

Item 4T.

Controls and Procedures

33

 

 

 

PART II.

OTHER INFORMATION

33

Item 1.

Legal Proceedings

33

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

33

Item 2.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds

33

Item 3.

Defaults Upon Senior Securities

33

Item 4.

Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders

34

Item 5.

Other Information

34

Item 6.

Exhibits

34

 

2



Table of Contents

 

PART I. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

Item 1. Financial Statements

 

NETLIST, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets

(in thousands, except par value)

 

 

 

(unaudited)

 

(audited)

 

 

 

July 4,

 

January 3,

 

 

 

2009

 

2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ASSETS

 

 

 

 

 

Current assets:

 

 

 

 

 

Cash and cash equivalents

 

$

10,106

 

$

15,214

 

Investments in marketable securities

 

9,096

 

5,199

 

Accounts receivable, net

 

1,523

 

1,917

 

Inventories

 

1,954

 

1,829

 

Income taxes receivable

 

651

 

1,880

 

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

759

 

761

 

Total current assets

 

24,089

 

26,800

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Property and equipment, net

 

5,621

 

6,939

 

Long-term investments in marketable securities

 

979

 

960

 

Other assets

 

221

 

234

 

Total assets

 

$

30,910

 

$

34,933

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

 

 

 

 

Current liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts payable

 

$

2,455

 

$

1,786

 

Revolving line of credit

 

2,153

 

 

Current portion of long-term debt

 

328

 

474

 

Current portion of deferred gain on sale and leaseback transaction

 

118

 

118

 

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

 

2,713

 

2,083

 

Total current liabilities

 

7,767

 

4,461

 

Long-term debt, net of current portion

 

36

 

130

 

Deferred gain on sale and leaseback transaction, net of current portion

 

49

 

108

 

Total liabilities

 

7,852

 

4,699

 

Commitments and contingencies

 

 

 

 

 

Stockholders’ equity:

 

 

 

 

 

Common stock, $0.001 par value - 90,000 shares authorized; 19,855 shares issued and outstanding

 

20

 

20

 

Additional paid-in capital

 

69,980

 

69,383

 

Accumulated deficit

 

(46,924

)

(39,113

)

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

(18

)

(56

)

Total stockholders’ equity

 

23,058

 

30,234

 

Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity

 

$

30,910

 

$

34,933

 

 

See accompanying notes.

 

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Table of Contents

 

NETLIST, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Operations

(in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

2009

 

2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

3,173

 

$

18,429

 

$

5,335

 

$

31,533

 

Cost of sales(1)

 

2,929

 

15,770

 

5,628

 

25,743

 

Gross profit (loss)

 

244

 

2,659

 

(293

)

5,790

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development(1)

 

2,030

 

1,716

 

3,644

 

3,292

 

Selling, general and administrative(1)

 

2,120

 

3,310

 

4,055

 

6,778

 

Total operating expenses

 

4,150

 

5,026

 

7,699

 

10,070

 

Operating loss

 

(3,906

)

(2,367

)

(7,992

)

(4,280

)

Other income:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income, net

 

18

 

104

 

100

 

343

 

Other income (expense), net

 

(45

)

23

 

130

 

(68

)

Total other income (expense), net

 

(27

)

127

 

230

 

275

 

Loss before provision (benefit) for income taxes

 

(3,933

)

(2,240

)

(7,762

)

(4,005

)

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

 

31

 

11

 

49

 

(1,170

)

Net loss

 

$

(3,964

)

$

(2,251

)

$

(7,811

)

$

(2,835

)

Net loss per common share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted

 

$

(0.20

)

$

(0.11

)

$

(0.39

)

$

(0.14

)

Weighted-average common shares outstanding:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic and diluted

 

19,855

 

19,855

 

19,855

 

19,839

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


(1)  Amounts include stock-based compensation expense as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cost of sales

 

$

38

 

$

48

 

$

67

 

$

62

 

Research and development

 

48

 

62

 

106

 

85

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

204

 

265

 

424

 

472

 

 

See accompanying notes.

 

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Table of Contents

 

NETLIST, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows

(in thousands)

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cash flows from operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(7,811

)

$

(2,835

)

Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Depreciation and amortization

 

1,150

 

1,054

 

Amortization of deferred gain on sale and leaseback transaction

 

(59

)

(59

)

Deferred income taxes

 

 

(990

)

Gain on disposal of assets

 

(118

)

 

Stock-based compensation

 

597

 

619

 

Changes in operating assets and liabilities:

 

 

 

 

 

Accounts receivable

 

394

 

5,593

 

Inventories

 

(125

)

(4,998

)

Income taxes receivable

 

1,229

 

(195

)

Prepaid expenses and other current assets

 

2

 

(583

)

Other assets

 

13

 

44

 

Accounts payable

 

669

 

(1,745

)

Accrued expenses and other current liabilities

 

630

 

(254

)

Net cash used in operating activities

 

(3,429

)

(4,349

)

Cash flows from investing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Acquisition of property and equipment

 

(56

)

(770

)

Proceeds from sales of equipment

 

342

 

 

Purchase of investments in marketable securities

 

(10,203

)

(6,672

)

Proceeds from maturities and sales of investments in marketable securities

 

6,325

 

17,500

 

Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities

 

(3,592

)

10,058

 

Cash flows from financing activities:

 

 

 

 

 

Borrowings on lines of credit

 

10,325

 

49,490

 

Payments on lines of credit

 

(8,172

)

(48,700

)

Payments on debt

 

(240

)

(434

)

Increase in restricted cash

 

 

(2,000

)

Reversal of unrealized excess tax benefit from exercise of warrants

 

 

(4

)

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

 

1,913

 

(1,648

)

(Decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents

 

(5,108

)

4,061

 

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period

 

15,214

 

7,182

 

Cash and cash equivalents at end of period

 

$

10,106

 

$

11,243

 

 

See accompanying notes.

 

5



Table of Contents

 

NETLIST, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO UNAUDITED CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

July 4, 2009

 

Note 1—Description of Business

 

Netlist, Inc. (the “Company” or “Netlist”) designs and manufactures high performance memory subsystems for the server, high performance computing and communications markets. The Company’s memory subsystems consist of dynamic random access memory integrated circuits, NAND flash memory, or NAND, and other components assembled on a printed circuit board. Headquartered in Irvine, California, Netlist’s solutions are targeted at applications where memory plays a key role in meeting system performance requirements. In 2007, the Company established a manufacturing facility in the People’s Republic of China, (the “PRC”), which became operational in July 2007 upon the successful qualification of certain key customers.

 

Note 2—Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The interim unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (the “US”) for interim financial information and with the instructions to Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) Form 10-Q and Article 8 of SEC Regulation S-X. These financial statements do not include all of the information and footnotes required by accounting principles generally accepted in the US for complete financial statements. Therefore, these unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements and notes thereto for the year ended January 3, 2009, included in the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC on March 30, 2009.

 

The condensed consolidated financial statements included herein as of July 4, 2009 are unaudited; however, they contain all normal recurring accruals and adjustments that, in the opinion of the Company’s management, are necessary to present fairly the consolidated financial position of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries as of July 4, 2009 and January 3, 2009, the consolidated results of its operations for the three and six months ended July 4, 2009 and June 28, 2008, and the consolidated cash flows for the six months ended July 4, 2009 and June 28, 2008. The results of operations for the three and six months ended July 4, 2009 are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for the full year or any future interim periods.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Netlist, Inc. and its wholly owned subsidiaries. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation.

 

Fiscal Year

 

The Company operates under a 52/53-week fiscal year ending on the Saturday closest to December 31. For fiscal 2009, the Company’s fiscal year end is scheduled to be January 2, 2010 and will consist of 52 weeks. Each of the Company’s first three quarters in a fiscal year is comprised of 13 weeks.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the US requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of the assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Significant estimates made by management include, among others, valuation of investments in marketable securities, provisions for uncollectible receivables and sales returns, warranty liabilities, valuation of inventories, recoverability of long-lived assets, stock-based compensation expense and realization of deferred tax assets. The Company bases its estimates and assumptions on current facts, historical experience and various other factors that it believes to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities and the accrual of costs and expenses that are not readily apparent from other sources. The actual results experienced by the Company may differ materially and adversely from its estimates. To the extent there are material differences between the estimates and the actual results, future results of operations will be affected.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company’s revenues primarily consist of product sales of high performance memory subsystems to original equipment manufacturers (“OEMs”). Revenues also include sales of excess inventories to distributors and other users of memory integrated circuits (“ICs”) totaling approximately $0.1 million and $0.1 million, respectively for the three and six months ended July 4, 2009, and approximately $0.1 million and $0.2 million, respectively, for the three and six months ended June 28, 2008.

 

The Company recognizes revenues in accordance with the SEC’s Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 104, Revenue Recognition (“SAB 104”). Under the provisions of SAB 104, the Company recognizes revenues when there is persuasive evidence that an arrangement, product delivery and acceptance have occurred, the sales price is fixed or determinable, and collectibility of the resulting receivable is reasonably assured.

 

The Company generally uses customer purchase orders and/or contracts as evidence of an arrangement. Delivery occurs when goods are shipped for customers with FOB Shipping Point terms and upon receipt for customers with FOB Destination terms, at which time title and risk of loss transfer to the customer. Shipping documents are used to verify delivery and customer acceptance. The Company assesses whether the sales price is fixed or determinable based on the payment terms associated with the transaction and whether the sales price is subject to refund. Customers are generally allowed limited rights of return for up to 30 days, except for sales of excess inventories, which contain no right-of-return privileges. Estimated returns are provided for at the time of sale based on historical experience or specific identification of an event necessitating a reserve. The Company offers a standard product warranty to its customers and has no other post-shipment obligations. The Company assesses collectibility based on the creditworthiness of the customer as determined by credit checks and evaluations, as well as the customer’s payment history.

 

A portion of the Company’s shipments are made to third-party inventory warehouses, or hubs, and the Company recognizes revenue when the inventory is pulled from the hub for use in production by the customer. The Company receives a report from the customer on a daily basis indicating the inventories pulled from a hub for use by the customer, and performs a daily reconciliation of inventories shipped to and pulled by the customer to those inventories reflected on the customer’s reports to ensure that sales are recognized in the appropriate periods.

 

All amounts billed to customers related to shipping and handling are classified as revenues, while all costs incurred by the Company for shipping and handling are classified as cost of sales.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

Cash and cash equivalents consist of cash and short-term investments with original maturities of three months or less.

 

Investments in Marketable Securities

 

The Company accounts for its investments in marketable securities in accordance with Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (“SFAS”) No. 115, Accounting for Certain Investments in Debt and Equity Securities , and Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Staff Position (“FSP”) Nos. 115-1 and 124-1, The Meaning of Other-Than-Temporary Impairment and Its Application to Certain Investments. The Company determines the appropriate classification of its investments at the time of purchase and reevaluates such designation at each balance sheet date. The Company’s investments in marketable securities have been classified and accounted for as available-for-sale based on management’s investment intentions relating to these securities. Available-for-sale securities are stated at market value, and are generally based on market quotes, to the extent they are available. Unrealized gains and losses, net of applicable deferred taxes, are recorded as a component of other comprehensive income (loss). Realized gains and losses and declines in value judged to be other than temporary are determined based on the specific identification method and are reported in other income, net in the unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations.

 

The Company generally invests its excess cash in domestic bank-issued certificates of deposit which carry federal deposit insurance, money market funds and in highly liquid debt instruments of US. municipalities, corporations and the US government and its agencies. All highly liquid investments with stated maturities of three months or less from the date of purchase are classified as cash equivalents; all investments with stated maturities of greater than three months are classified as investments in marketable securities.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company’s financial instruments consist principally of cash and cash equivalents, investments in marketable securities, accounts receivable, accounts payable, accrued expenses and debt instruments. Effective December 30, 2007, the Company adopted SFAS No. 157, Fair Value Measurements (“SFAS 157”), which defines fair value, establishes a framework for measuring fair value in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S. and expands required disclosures about fair value measurements. Pursuant to SFAS 157, other than for certain investments in auction rate securities (see Note 4), the fair value of the Company’s cash equivalents and investments in marketable securities is determined based on quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or Level 1 inputs. The Company believes that the carrying values of all other financial instruments approximate their current fair values due to their nature and respective durations.

 

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

 

The Company evaluates the collectibility of accounts receivable based on a combination of factors. In cases where the Company is aware of circumstances that may impair a specific customer’s ability to meet its financial obligations subsequent to the original sale, the Company will record an allowance against amounts due, and thereby reduce the net recognized receivable to the amount the Company reasonably believes will be collected. For all other customers, the Company records allowances for doubtful accounts based primarily on the length of time the receivables are past due, the current business environment and its historical experience.

 

Concentration of Credit Risk

 

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to significant concentrations of credit risk consist principally of cash and cash equivalents, investments in marketable securities, and accounts receivable.

 

The Company invests primarily in money market funds, certificates of deposit and high-credit quality debt instruments. Cash equivalents are maintained with high quality institutions, the composition and maturities of which are regularly monitored by management. Investments in marketable securities are generally in high-credit quality debt instruments with an active resale market. Such investments are made only in instruments issued or enhanced by high-quality institutions. The US. Treasury through a Temporary Guarantee Program of Money Market funds has guaranteed money market investments on hand as of September 19, 2008. These funds are guaranteed through September 18, 2009. The Company had $7.4 million of US Treasury guaranteed money market funds and FDIC insured funds at July 4, 2009.  In addition, the Company had $3.5 million in treasury notes that are direct obligations of the US government. The Company has not incurred any credit risk losses related to these investments.

 

The Company’s trade accounts receivable are primarily derived from sales to OEMs in the computer industry. The Company performs credit evaluations of its customers’ financial condition and limits the amount of credit extended when deemed necessary, but generally require no collateral. The Company believes that the concentration of credit risk in its trade receivables is moderated by its credit evaluation process, relatively short collection terms and the high level of credit worthiness of its customers. Reserves are maintained for potential credit losses, and such losses historically have not been significant and have been within management’s expectations.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined on an average cost basis which approximates actual cost on a first-in, first-out basis and includes raw materials, labor and manufacturing overhead. At each balance sheet date, the Company evaluates its ending inventories for excess quantities and obsolescence. Among other factors, the Company considers historical demand and forecasted demand in relation to the inventory on hand, competitiveness of product offerings, market conditions and product life cycles when determining obsolescence and net realizable value. Provisions are made to reduce excess or obsolete inventories to their estimated net realizable values. Once established, write-downs are considered permanent adjustments to the cost basis of the excess or obsolete inventories.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are recorded at cost and depreciated on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives, which generally range from three to seven years. Leasehold improvements are recorded at cost and amortized on a straight-line basis over the shorter of their estimated useful lives or the remaining lease term.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Warranties

 

The Company offers warranties generally ranging from one to three years to its customers, other than on sales of excess inventory, depending on the product and negotiated terms of purchase agreements. Such warranties require the Company to repair or replace defective product returned to the Company during the warranty period at no cost to the customer. The Company records an estimate for warranty-related costs at the time of sale based on, among other factors, its historical and estimated product return rates and expected repair or replacement costs. Such costs have historically been consistent between periods and in-line with management’s expectations.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company accounts for equity issuances to non-employees in accordance with Emerging Issues Task Force Issue No. 96-18, Accounting for Equity Instruments that are Issued to Other Than Employees for Acquiring, or in Conjunction with Selling, Goods and Services . All transactions in which goods or services are the consideration received for the issuance of equity instruments are accounted for based on the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instrument issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The measurement date used to determine the fair value of the equity instrument issued is the earlier of the date on which the third-party performance is complete or the date on which it is probable that performance will occur.

 

In accordance with SFAS No. 123(R), Share-Based Payment (“SFAS 123R”), employee and director stock-based compensation expense recognized during the period is based on the value of the portion of stock-based payment awards that is ultimately expected to vest during the period. Stock-based compensation expense recognized in the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations is based on the grant date fair value estimated in accordance with the provisions of SFAS 123R. Given that stock-based compensation expense recognized in the unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations is based on awards ultimately expected to vest, it has been reduced for estimated forfeitures. SFAS 123R requires forfeitures to be estimated at the time of grant and revised, if necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates. The estimated average forfeiture rates used by the Company are based on historical forfeiture experience and estimated future forfeitures.

 

The fair value of common stock option awards to employees and directors is calculated using the Black-Scholes option pricing model. The Black-Scholes model requires subjective assumptions regarding future stock price volatility and expected time to exercise, along with assumptions about the risk-free interest rate and expected dividends, which affect the estimated fair values of these awards. The expected term of options granted is derived from historical data on employee exercises and post-vesting employment termination behavior. The expected volatility is based on the historical volatilities of our common stock. The risk-free rate selected to value any particular grant is based on the US Treasury rate that corresponds to the expected term of the grant effective as of the date of the grant. The expected dividends assumption is based on the Company’s history and expectation of dividend payouts. These factors could change in the future, affecting the determination of stock-based compensation expense in future periods.

 

Income Taxes

 

Under Accounting Principles Board Opinion No. 28, Interim Financial Reporting (“APB 28”), the Company is required to adjust its effective tax rate each quarter to be consistent with the estimated annual effective tax rate. The Company is also required to record the tax impact of certain discrete items, unusual or infrequently occurring, including changes in judgment about valuation allowances and effects of changes in tax laws or rates, in the interim period in which they occur. In addition, jurisdictions with a projected loss for the year or a year-to-date loss where no tax benefit can be recognized are excluded from the estimated annual effective tax rate. The impact of such an exclusion could result in a higher or lower effective tax rate during a particular quarter, based upon the mix and timing of actual earnings versus annual projections.

 

The Company accounts for income taxes in accordance with SFAS No. 109, Accounting for Income Taxes (“SFAS 109”). Under SFAS 109, deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized to reflect the estimated future tax effects, calculated at currently effective tax rates, of future deductible or taxable amounts attributable to events that have been recognized on a cumulative basis in the consolidated financial statements. A valuation allowance related to a deferred tax asset is recorded when it is more likely than not that some portion of the deferred tax asset will not be realized.

 

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The Company adopted FASB Interpretation No. 48, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes—An Interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109 (“FIN 48”) on December 31, 2006, the first day of its 2007 fiscal year. FIN 48 seeks to reduce the diversity in practice associated with certain aspects of measurement and recognition in accounting for income taxes. FIN 48 prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement requirement for the financial statement recognition of a tax position that has been taken or is expected to be taken on a tax return and also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure, and transition. Under FIN 48 the Company may only recognize or continue to recognize tax positions that meet a “more likely than not” threshold.

 

Research and Development Expenses

 

Research and development expenditures are expensed in the period incurred.

 

Comprehensive Income (Loss)

 

SFAS No. 130, Reporting Comprehensive Income , establishes standards for reporting and displaying comprehensive income and its components in the consolidated financial statements. Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) includes unrealized gains or losses on investments.

 

Risks and Uncertainties

 

The Company’s operations in the PRC are subject to various political, geographical and economic risks and uncertainties inherent to conducting business in China. These include, but are not limited to, (i) potential changes in economic conditions in the region, (ii) managing a local workforce that may subject the Company to uncertainties or certain regulatory policies and (iii) changes in other policies of the Chinese governmental and regulatory agencies. Additionally, the Chinese government controls the procedures by which its local currency, the Chinese Renminbi (“RMB”), is converted into other currencies. If changes or restrictions in the conversion of RMB are instituted, the Company’s operations and operating results may be negatively impacted.

 

Foreign Currency Remeasurement

 

The functional currency of the Company’s foreign subsidiaries is the U.S. dollar. Local currency financial statements are remeasured into U.S. dollars using the current exchange rate for monetary assets and liabilities and the historical exchange rate for nonmonetary assets and liabilities. Expenses are remeasured using the average exchange rate for the period, except items related to nonmonetary assets and liabilities, which are remeasured using historical exchange rates. All remeasurement gains and losses are included in determining net income (loss).

 

Net Income (Loss) Per Share

 

Basic net income (loss) per share is calculated by dividing net income (loss) by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted net income (loss) per share is calculated by dividing the net income (loss) by the weighted-average number of shares and dilutive potential common shares outstanding during the period. Dilutive potential shares consist of dilutive shares issuable upon the exercise of outstanding stock options and warrants computed using the treasury stock method.

 

New Accounting Pronouncements

 

In June 2009, the FASB issued SFAS No. 168, The FASB Accounting Standards Codification™ and the Hierarchy of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles — a Replacement of FASB Statement No. 162 (“SFAS No. 168”) The Codification will become the source of authoritative U.S. GAAP.  The statement is effective for financial statements issued for interim and annual periods ending after September 15, 2009.  The Company expects to adopt this standard with the filing of its Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the period ended October 3, 2009 and does not expect the standard to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

In April 2009, the FASB issued FSP FAS 157-4, Determining Fair Value When the Volume and Level of Activity for the Asset or Liability Have Significantly Decreased and Identifying Transactions That Are Not Orderly (“FSP FAS 157-4”), which provides additional guidance for estimating fair value in accordance with SFAS 157.  FSP FAS 157-4 states that a significant decrease in the volume and level of activity for the asset or liability when compared with normal market activity is an indication that transactions or quoted prices may not be determinative of fair value because there may be increased instances of transactions that are not orderly in such market conditions.  The adoption of FSP FAS 157-4 did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or liquidity.

 

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In April 2009, the FASB issued FSP FAS 107-1 and APB 28-1, Interim Disclosures about Fair Value of Financial Instruments (“FSP FAS 107-1 and APB 28-1”), which requires disclosures about the fair value of the Company’s financial instruments for which it is practicable to estimate that value, whether recognized or not recognized in the balance sheets, in the interim reporting periods as well as in the annual reporting periods. In addition, FSP FAS 107-1 and APB 28-1 requires disclosures of the methods and significant assumptions used to estimate the fair value of those financial instruments.  FSP FAS 107-1 and APB 28-1 became effective for the Company in its second quarter of fiscal 2009.  The adoption of FSP FAS 107-1 and APB 28-1 did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or liquidity.

 

In April 2009, the FASB issued FSP FAS 115-2 and FAS 124-2, Recognition and Presentation of Other-Than-Temporary Impairments (“FSP FAS 115-2 and FAS 124-2”), which establishes a new method of recognizing and reporting other-than-temporary impairments of debt securities and requires additional disclosures related to debt and equity securities.  FSP FAS 115-2 and FAS 124-2 does not change existing recognition and measurement guidance related to other-than-temporary impairments of equity securities. FSP FAS 115-2 and FAS 124-2 became effective for the Company in its second quarter of fiscal 2009.  The adoption of FSP FAS 115-2 and FAS 124-2 did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or liquidity.

 

In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 141(R), Business Combinations (“SFAS 141(R)”), which replaces SFAS 141. The provisions of SFAS 141(R) are similar to those of SFAS 141; however, SFAS 141(R) requires companies to record most identifiable assets, liabilities, noncontrolling interests, and goodwill acquired in a business combination at “full fair value.” SFAS 141(R) also requires companies to record fair value estimates of contingent consideration and certain other potential liabilities during the original purchase price allocation and to expense acquisition costs as incurred. SFAS 141(R) applies to all business combinations, including combinations by contract alone. Further, under SFAS 141(R), all business combinations will be accounted for by applying the acquisition method. SFAS 141(R) is effective for fiscal years beginning on or after December 15, 2008. The Company expects SFAS 141(R) will have an impact on its consolidated financial statements, but the nature and magnitude of the specific effects will depend upon the nature, terms and size of the acquisitions that the Company consummates.

 

In December 2007, the FASB issued SFAS No. 160, Noncontrolling Interests in Consolidated Financial Statements (“SFAS 160”), which will require noncontrolling interests (previously referred to as minority interests) to be treated as a separate component of equity, not as a liability or other item outside of permanent equity. SFAS 160 applies to the accounting for noncontrolling interests and transactions with non-controlling interest holders in consolidated financial statements. SFAS 160 will be applied prospectively to all noncontrolling interests, including any that arose before the effective date except that comparative period information must be recast to classify noncontrolling interests in equity, attribute net income and other comprehensive income to noncontrolling interests, and provide other disclosures required by SFAS 160. SFAS 160 is effective for periods beginning on or after December 15, 2008. The adoption of SFAS 160 did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or liquidity.

 

Note 3—Supplemental Financial Information

 

Inventories

 

Inventories consist of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

July 4,

 

January 3,

 

 

 

2009

 

2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Raw materials

 

$

1,580

 

$

976

 

Work in process

 

161

 

111

 

Finished goods

 

213

 

742

 

 

 

$

1,954

 

$

1,829

 

 

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Table of Contents

 

Warranty Liability

 

The following table summarizes the activity related to the warranty liability (in thousands):

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning balance

 

$

277

 

$

353

 

Charged to costs and expenses

 

92

 

8

 

Usage

 

(108

)

(70

)

Ending balance

 

$

261

 

$

291

 

 

The warranty liability is included as a component of accrued expenses and other current liabilities in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

Facility Relocation Costs

 

The following table summarizes the activity related to the Company’s accrual for facility relocation costs during the six months ended July 4, 2009 and June 28, 2008 (in thousands):

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning balance

 

$

80

 

$

103

 

Charged to costs and expenses

 

61

 

 

Net payments

 

(17

)

(46

)

Ending balance

 

$

124

 

$

57

 

 

The liability for facility relocation costs is included as a component of accrued expenses and other current liabilities in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheets.

 

Comprehensive Loss

 

The components of comprehensive loss, net of taxes, consist of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

2009

 

2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net loss

 

$

(3,964

)

$

(2,251

)

$

(7,811

)

$

(2,835

)

Other comprehensive loss:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Change in net unrealized loss on investments

 

6

 

68

 

38

 

23

 

Reclassification adjustment for net realized gain included in net loss

 

 

 

 

(13

)

Total comprehensive loss

 

$

(3,958

)

$

(2,183

)

$

(7,773

)

$

(2,825

)

 

Accumulated other comprehensive loss reflected on the condensed consolidated balance sheets at July 4, 2009 and January 3, 2009, represents accumulated net unrealized losses on investments in marketable securities.

 

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Computation of Net Loss Per Share

 

Basic and diluted net loss per share is calculated by dividing net loss by the weighted-average number of common shares outstanding during the period. The following table sets forth the computation of net loss per share (in thousands, except per share data):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

2009

 

2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Numerator: Net loss

 

$

(3,964

)

$

(2,251

)

$

(7,811

)

$

(2,835

)

Denominator: Weighted-average common shares outstanding

 

19,855

 

19,855

 

19,855

 

19,839

 

Net loss per share, basic and diluted

 

$

(0.20

)

$

(0.11

)

$

(0.39

)

$

(0.14

)

 

The following table sets forth potentially dilutive common share equivalents, consisting of shares issuable upon the exercise of outstanding stock options and warrants computed using the treasury stock method, which have been excluded from the diluted net loss per share calculations above as their effect would be anti-dilutive for the periods then ended (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

2009

 

2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Common share equivalents

 

388

 

867

 

277

 

868

 

 

The above common share equivalents would have been included in the calculation of diluted earnings per share had the Company reported net income for the periods then ended.

 

Major Customers

 

The Company’s product sales have historically been concentrated in a small number of customers. The following table sets forth sales to customers comprising 10% or more of the Company’s total revenues for the periods presented:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

2009

 

2008

 

Customer:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dell

 

60

%

60

%

49

%

66

%

Hewlett Packard

 

*

%

26

%

*

%

22

%

Arrow Electronics

 

15

%

*

%

17

%

*

%

 


* less than 10% of net sales

 

The Company’s accounts receivable are concentrated with two customers at July 4, 2009, representing approximately 62% and 27% of aggregate gross receivables. A significant reduction in sales to, or the inability to collect receivables from, a significant customer could have a material adverse impact on the Company.

 

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Note 4—Fair Value Measurements

 

In accordance with SFAS 157, the following table details the fair value measurements within the fair value hierarchy of the Company’s investments in marketable securities (in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

Fair Value Measurements at July 4, 2009 Using

 

 

 

 

 

Quoted Prices in

 

Significant Other

 

Significant

 

 

 

Fair Value at

 

Active Markets for

 

Observable

 

Unobservable

 

 

 

July 4,

 

Identical Assets

 

Inputs

 

Inputs

 

 

 

2009

 

(Level 1)

 

(Level 2)

 

(Level 3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Investments in marketable securities

 

$

10,075

 

$

9,096

 

$

 

$

979

 

 

Fair value measurements using Level 3 inputs in the table above relate to the Company’s investments in auction rate securities. Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs used to estimate the fair value of assets or liabilities and are utilized to the extent that observable inputs are not available.

 

The following table provides a reconciliation of the beginning and ending balances for the Company’s assets measured at fair value using Level 3 inputs (in thousands):

 

 

 

Six Months
Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

 

 

2009

 

 

 

 

 

Beginning balance

 

$

960

 

Transfers into Level 3

 

 

Unrealized gain included in accumulated other comprehensive loss

 

19

 

Purchases, sales, issuances and settlements, net

 

 

Ending balance

 

$

979

 

 

Note 5—Investments in Marketable Securities

 

Investments in marketable securities consist of the following at July 4, 2009 (in thousands):

 

 

 

July 4, 2009

 

 

 

 

 

Net

 

 

 

 

 

Amortized

 

Unrealized

 

Fair

 

 

 

Cost

 

Gain (Loss)

 

Value

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Certificates of deposit

 

$

245

 

$

 

$

245

 

US Government

 

3,557

 

2

 

3,559

 

Federal agency notes and bonds

 

5,289

 

3

 

5,292

 

Auction and variable floating rate notes

 

1,002

 

(23

)

979

 

 

 

$

10,093

 

$

(18

)

$

10,075

 

 

Realized gains and losses on the sale of investments in marketable securities are determined using the specific identification method. Net realized gains recorded during the six months ended July 4, 2009 were not significant.

 

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Table of Contents

 

The following table provides the breakdown of investments in marketable securities with unrealized losses at July 4, 2009 (in thousands):

 

 

 

July 4, 2009

 

 

 

Continuous Unrealized Loss

 

 

 

Less than 12 months

 

12 months or greater

 

 

 

Fair

 

Unrealized

 

Fair

 

Unrealized

 

 

 

Value

 

Loss

 

Value

 

Loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Certificates of deposit

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

$

 

US Government

 

 

 

 

 

Federal agency notes and bonds

 

 

 

 

 

Auction and variable floating rate notes

 

 

 

1,002

 

(23

)

 

 

$

 

$

 

$

1,002

 

$

(23

)

 

As of July 4, 2009, the Company held two investments that were in an unrealized loss position.

 

Auction Rate Securities

 

The recent disruptions in the credit market continue to adversely affect the liquidity and overall market for auction rate securities. As of July 4, 2009, the Company held two investments in auction rate securities with a total purchased cost of $1.0 million. These two investments represent (i) a fully insured debt obligation of a municipality and (ii)  Baa1 and A3 rated debt obligations backed by pools of student loans guaranteed by the U.S. Department of Education. Given the insufficient observable market inputs and related information available, the Company has classified its investments in auction rate securities within Level 3 of the fair value hierarchy. The Company has estimated the fair value of these investments using a discounted cash flow model which included assumptions about the credit quality and expected duration of the investments, along with discount rates affected for the general lack of liquidity. These assumptions reflect the Company’s estimates about the reasonable assumptions market participants would likely use in valuing the investments, including assumptions about risk, developed based on the best information available in the circumstances.

 

The Company does not believe that the current illiquidity of its investments in auction rate securities will materially impact its ability to fund its working capital needs, capital expenditures or other business requirements. The Company, however, remains uncertain as to when liquidity will return to the auction rate markets, whether other secondary markets will become available or when the underlying securities may be called by the issuer. Given these and other uncertainties, the Company’s investments in auction rate securities have been classified as long-term investments in marketable securities in the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated balance sheet as of July 4, 2009. The Company has concluded that the estimated gross unrealized losses on these investments, which totaled approximately $23,000 at July 4, 2009, are temporary because (i) the Company believes that the absence of liquidity that has occurred is due to general market conditions, (ii) the auction rate securities continue to be of a high credit quality and interest is paid as due and (iii) the Company has the intent and ability to hold these investments until a recovery in the market occurs.

 

Other Investments in Marketable Securities

 

The Company maintains an investment portfolio of various holdings, types and maturities. The Company invests in instruments that meet high quality credit standards, as specified in its investment policy guidelines. These guidelines generally limit the amount of credit exposure to any one issue, issuer or type of instrument. The fair value of the Company’s investments in marketable securities could change significantly in the future and the Company may be required to record other-than-temporary impairment charges or additional unrealized losses in future periods.

 

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Table of Contents

 

The following table presents the amortized cost and fair value of the Company’s investments in marketable securities classified as available-for-sale at July 4, 2009 by contractual maturity (in thousands):

 

 

 

Amortized

 

Fair

 

 

 

Cost

 

Value

 

Maturity

 

 

 

 

 

Less than one year

 

$

9,091

 

$

9,096

 

One to two years

 

 

 

Greater than two years*

 

1,002

 

979

 

 

 

$

10,093

 

$

10,075

 

 


*

Comprised of auction rate securities which generally have reset dates of 90 days or less but final contractual maturity dates in excess of 15 years.

 

Note 6—Credit Agreement

 

Under the Company’s revolving line of credit agreement with its bank, the Company may borrow up to the greater of 85% of eligible accounts receivable plus the least of (i) a percentage of eligible inventory determined from time to time by the Company’s bank, (ii) 80% of the orderly liquidation value, as defined, of eligible inventories, and (iii) $1 million. Interest is payable monthly at the greater of (i) the sum of prime rate plus 3%, (ii) LIBOR plus 6% or (iii) 8%. This line of credit expired on July 31, 2009; however, subsequent to quarter end, this line of credit agreement was extended until August 31, 2009. Maximum borrowings on the line are $5,000,000.

 

In connection with its credit agreement, the Company was provided an equipment line of credit allowing it to borrow up to $3.9 million through January 3, 2009. The Company is required to repay the equipment advances in monthly installments of $32,440. Interest on the equipment advances is payable monthly, at the Company’s option, at the greater of (i)  prime rate plus 3%, (ii) LIBOR plus 6% or (iii) 8%.

 

The following table presents details of interest expense related to borrowings on the line of credit, along with certain other applicable information (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

2009

 

2008

 

Interest expense

 

$

9

 

$

26

 

$

12

 

$

86

 

 

 

 

July 4,

 

January 3,

 

 

 

2009

 

2009

 

Outstanding borrowings on the line of credit

 

$

2,153

 

$

 

Borrowing availability under the line of credit

 

$

 

$

1,701

 

 

Any borrowings under the Company’s revolving and equipment lines of credit are collateralized by a general first priority lien against all of the Company’s assets, both tangible and intangible.

 

As of July 4, 2009, the Company was in compliance with its financial covenants under its credit agreement.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Note 7—Long-Term Debt

 

Long-term debt consists of the following (in thousands):

 

 

 

July 4,

 

January 3,

 

 

 

2009

 

2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Obligations under capital leases

 

$

109

 

$

148

 

Equipment note payable to bank

 

255

 

450

 

Notes payable to others

 

 

6

 

 

 

364

 

604

 

Less current portion

 

(328

)

(474

)

 

 

$

36

 

$

130

 

 

Interest expense related to long-term debt is presented in the following table (in thousands):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

2009

 

2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest expense

 

$

8

 

$

30

 

$

19

 

$

67

 

 

Note 8—Income Taxes

 

The following table sets forth the Company’s provision (benefit) for income taxes, along with the corresponding effective tax rates (in thousands, except percentages):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

2009

 

2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

 

$

31

 

$

11

 

$

49

 

$

(1,170

)

Effective tax rate

 

1

%

%

1

%

(29

)%

 

Under APB 28, Interim Financial Reporting , the Company is required to adjust its effective tax rate each quarter to be consistent with the estimated annual effective tax rate.  The Company is also required to record the tax impact of certain discrete items, unusual or infrequently occurring, including changes in judgment about valuation allowances and effects of changes in tax laws or rates, in the interim period in which they occur.  In addition, jurisdictions with a projected loss for the year or a year-to-date loss where no tax benefit can be recognized are excluded from the estimated annual effective tax rate.  The impact of such an exclusion could result in a higher or lower effective tax rate during a particular quarter, based upon the mix and timing of actual earnings versus annual projections.

 

In accordance with SFAS No. 109, Accounting for Income Taxes , the Company evaluates whether a valuation allowance should be established against its deferred tax assets based on the consideration of all available evidence using a “more likely than not” standard.

 

As of July 4, 2009, the Company has provided a full valuation allowance and no benefit has been recognized for net operating losses and other deferred tax assets due to uncertainty of future utilization.

 

The Company had unrecognized tax benefits under FIN 48 at fiscal year end January 3, 2009 of approximately $0.6 million.  The Company anticipates a reduction of approximately $0.5 million of unrecognized tax benefits as a result of a lapse in applicable federal and state statutes of limitations during the current fiscal year.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Note 9—Commitments and Contingencies

 

Federal Securities Class Action

 

Beginning in May 2007, the Company, certain of its officers and directors, and the Company’s underwriters were named as defendants in four purported class action shareholder complaints, two of which were filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York, and two of which were filed in the U.S. District Court for the Central District of California. These purported class action lawsuits were filed on behalf of persons and entities who purchased or otherwise acquired the Company’s common stock pursuant or traceable to the Company’s November 30, 2006 initial public offering (the “IPO”). The lawsuits were consolidated into a single action—Belodoff v. Netlist, Inc., Lead Case No. SACV07-677 DOC (MLGx)—which is currently pending in the Central District of California. Lead Plaintiff filed the Consolidated Complaint on November 5, 2007. Defendants filed their motions to dismiss the Consolidated Complaint on January 9, 2008. The motions to dismiss were taken under submission on April 28, 2008 and on May 30, 2008, the Court granted the defendants’ motions. However, plaintiffs were granted the right to amend their complaint and subsequently filed their First Amended Consolidated Class Action Complaint (the “Amended Complaint”) on July 15, 2008. Generally, the Amended Complaint alleged that the Registration Statement issued by the Company in connection with the IPO contained untrue statements of material fact or omissions of material fact in violation of Sections 11 and 15 of Securities Act of 1933. The defendants filed motions to dismiss the Amended Complaint on January 9, 2009, and on April 17, 2009, the Court granted defendants’ motions to dismiss.  However, plaintiffs were again granted the right to amend their complaint.  Plaintiffs’ filed a second amended complaint on or about May 21, 2009.  Defendants filed motions to dismiss the second amended complaint on June 22, 2009, and oral arguments on the motions to dismiss are scheduled for August 31, 2009. The Company believes that the allegations lack merit and intends to vigorously defend all claims asserted. However, at this time, the Company is unable to form a professional judgment that an unfavorable outcome is either probable or remote, and it is not possible to assess whether or not the outcome of these proceedings will or will not have a material adverse effect on the Company. If an unfavorable outcome should eventually occur, the Company is not at this time able to estimate the amount or range of possible loss.

 

California Derivative Action

 

In August 2007, a derivative lawsuit was filed in California Superior Court for County of Orange-Smith v. Hong, Case No. 07CC01359-against certain of the Company’s officers and directors. This action contains factual allegations similar to those of the federal class action lawsuit described above, but the plaintiff in this case asserts claims for violations of California’s insider trading laws, breaches of fiduciary duty, abuse of control, gross mismanagement, waste of corporate assets, and unjust enrichment. The plaintiff seeks unspecified damages, equitable and/or injunctive relief and disgorgement of all profits, benefits and other compensation obtained by the defendants. The defendants in this action have not responded to the complaint. Pursuant to a stipulation, the parties agreed to temporarily stay the action pending the ultimate decision on the defendants’ motions to dismiss in the federal securities class action.  In April 2009, following a voluntary mediation of the matter which took place in December 2008, the parties reached a tentative agreement to settle the derivative action. In June 2009, the parties executed a Stipulation and Agreement of Settlement of Derivative Claims documenting the essential terms of the proposed settlement, and on June 26, 2009, the parties filed their joint motion for preliminary approval of the proposed settlement with the Court. The Court granted preliminary approval of the proposed settlement on July 27, 2009.  The final hearing on the proposed settlement is set for November 5, 2009. The Company makes no assurances at this time that the Court will grant final approval of the proposed settlement terms or that the matter ultimately will be settled.  Despite the pending settlement reached in this derivative action, the Company believes that the allegations lack merit.  In addition, the Company received correspondence from counsel for a purported shareholder requesting that the Company take actions to investigate and remedy alleged wrongdoing by unidentified former and current officers and/or directors based on allegations similar to those in the Smith v. Hong derivative case. The Company, through its Board of Directors, has evaluated and rejected this request.  The proposed settlement also is intended to resolve any remaining issues arising from this shareholder request.  Despite the pending settlement reached, the Company believes that the allegations raised in the shareholder request also lack merit.

 

Patent Claims

 

In May 2008, the Company initiated discussions with Google, Inc. regarding the Company’s claims that Google has infringed on a US Patent assigned to the Company relating generally to “rank multiplication” in memory modules. On August 29, 2008, Google filed a declaratory judgment lawsuit against the Company in United States District Court for the Northern District of California, seeking a declaration that Google did not infringe on the Company’s patent, and that the Company’s patent is invalid. Google is not seeking any monetary damages. On November 18, 2008, the Company filed a counterclaim for infringement of the patent by Google. The Company expects to vigorously pursue its claim against Google and to vigorously defend against Google’s claim of invalidity.

 

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On March 17, 2009, the Company filed a complaint for patent infringement against MetaRAM, Inc. for its infringement of one of the Company’s patents. On March 26, 2009, MetaRAM filed a complaint against the Company for patent infringement. The parties are currently discussing an amicable settlement of these claims.  If these discussions are unsuccessful, the Company expects to vigorously pursue its claim against MetaRAM and to vigorously defend against MetaRAM’s separate claim.

 

Trade Secret Claim

 

On November 18, 2008, the Company filed a claim for trade secret misappropriation against Texas Instruments (TI) in Santa Clara County Superior Court, based in TI’s disclosure of confidential Company materials to the JEDEC standard-setting body.  On February 20, 2009, TI filed its answer.  The parties are currently engaged in settlement discussions.  If those discussions are unsuccessful, the Company expects to vigorously pursue its claims against TI.

 

Other Contingent Obligations

 

During its normal course of business, the Company has made certain indemnities, commitments and guarantees under which it may be required to make payments in relation to certain transactions. These include (i) intellectual property indemnities to the Company’s customers and licensees in connection with the use, sales and/or license of Company products; (ii) indemnities to vendors and service providers pertaining to claims based on the Company’s negligence or willful misconduct; (iii) indemnities involving the accuracy of representations and warranties in certain contracts; (iv) indemnities to directors and officers of the Company to the maximum extent permitted under the laws of the State of Delaware; and (v) certain real estate leases, under which the Company may be required to indemnify property owners for environmental and other liabilities, and other claims arising from the Company’s use of the applicable premises. The duration of these indemnities, commitments and guarantees varies and, in certain cases, may be indefinite. The majority of these indemnities, commitments and guarantees do not provide for any limitation of the maximum potential for future payments the Company could be obligated to make. Historically, the Company has not been obligated to make significant payments for these obligations, and no liabilities have been recorded for these indemnities, commitments and guarantees in the accompanying consolidated balance sheets.

 

Note 10—Stock Options and Warrants

 

Common Stock Options

 

A summary of the Company’s common stock option activity as of and for the six months ended July 4, 2009 is presented below (shares in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-

 

 

 

 

 

Average

 

 

 

Number of

 

Exercise

 

 

 

Shares

 

Price

 

Options outstanding at January 3, 2009

 

4,281

 

$

2.64

 

Options granted

 

630

 

0.33

 

Options exercised

 

 

 

Options cancelled

 

(382

)

1.98

 

Options outstanding at July 4, 2009

 

4,529

 

$

2.37

 

 

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The following table presents details of the assumptions used to calculate the weighted-average grant date fair value of commons stock options granted by the Company:

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

Expected term (in years)

 

5.4

 

5.4

 

Expected volatility

 

111

%

80

%

Risk-free interest rate

 

2.96

%

3.10

%

Expected dividends

 

 

 

Weighted-average grant date fair value per share

 

$

0.27

 

$

1.11

 

 

At July 4, 2009, the amount of unearned stock-based compensation currently estimated to be expensed from fiscal 2009 through fiscal 2012 related to unvested common stock options is approximately $1.9 million, net of estimated forfeitures. The weighted-average period over which the unearned stock-based compensation is expected to be recognized is approximately 1.7 years. If there are any modifications or cancellations of the underlying unvested common stock options, the Company may be required to accelerate, increase or cancel any remaining unearned stock-based compensation expense. Future stock-based compensation expense and unearned stock-based compensation will increase to the extent that the Company grants additional common stock options or other stock-based awards.

 

Warrants

 

A summary of activity with respect to outstanding warrants to purchase shares of the Company’s common stock as of and for the six months ended July 4, 2009 is presented below (shares in thousands):

 

 

 

 

 

Weighted-

 

 

 

 

 

Average

 

 

 

Number of

 

Exercise

 

 

 

Shares

 

Price

 

Warrants outstanding at January 3, 2009

 

18

 

$

1.25

 

Warrants granted

 

 

 

Warrants exercised

 

 

 

Warrants cancelled

 

 

 

Warrants outstanding and exercisable at July 4, 2009

 

18

 

$

1.25

 

 

Note 11—Segment and Geographic Information

 

The Company operates in one reportable segment: the design and manufacture of high-performance memory subsystems for the server, high-performance computing and communications markets. The Company evaluates financial performance on a Company-wide basis.

 

At July 4, 2009, approximately $3.5 million of the Company’s net long-lived assets were located outside the U.S., primarily in the PRC.

 

Item 2.    Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

Cautionary Statement

 

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our Unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements and the related notes thereto contained in Part I, Item 1 of this Report. The information contained in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q is not a complete description of our business or the risks associated with an investment in our common stock. We urge you to carefully review and consider the various disclosures made by us in this Report and in our other reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC, including our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended January 3, 2009 and subsequent reports on Form 10-Q and Form 8-K, which discuss our business in greater detail.

 

The section entitled “Risk Factors” set forth in Part II, Item 1A of this Report, and similar discussions in our other SEC filings, describe some of the important risk factors that may affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. You should carefully consider those risks, in addition to the other information in this Report and in our other filings with the SEC, before deciding to purchase, hold or sell our common stock.

 

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This Report contains forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties, estimates and assumptions. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to certain risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to predict. Therefore, our actual results could differ materially and adversely from those expressed in any forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including but not limited to those identified under the heading “Risk Factors” set forth in Part II, Item 1A of this Report.  We undertake no obligation to revise or update publicly any forward-looking statements for any reason.

 

Overview

 

We design, manufacture and sell high performance memory subsystems for the server, high performance computing and communications markets. Our memory subsystems consist of dynamic random access memory integrated circuits, (DRAM ICs”) , NAND flash memory, (“NAND”), and other components assembled on a printed circuit board, (“PCB”). We also design custom semiconductor logic devices which are integrated into our memory subsystems in order to increase their performance. We engage with our original equipment manufacturer, (“OEM”), customers from the earliest stages of new product definition, which provides us unique insight into their full range of system architecture and performance requirements. This close collaboration has also allowed us to develop a significant level of systems expertise. We leverage a portfolio of proprietary technologies and design techniques, including efficient planar design, alternative packaging techniques and custom semiconductor logic, to deliver memory subsystems with high memory density, small form factor, high signal integrity, attractive thermal characteristics and low cost per bit.

 

Consistent with the concentrated nature of the OEM customer base in our target markets, a small number of large customers have historically accounted for a significant portion of our net sales. Dell and Arrow Electronics represented approximately 49% and 17%, respectively, of our net sales for the six months ended July 4, 2009. Dell and Hewlett Packard represented approximately 66% and 22%, respectively, of our net sales for the six months ended June 28, 2008. Net sales to some of our OEM customers include memory modules that are qualified by us directly with the OEM customer and sold to electronic manufacturing services providers, (“EMSs”), for incorporation into products manufactured exclusively for the OEM customer. These net sales to EMSs have historically fluctuated period by period as a portion of the total net sales to these OEM customers. Net sales to Hon Hai Precision Industry Co. Ltd., an EMS that purchases memory modules from us for incorporation into products manufactured exclusively for Dell, represented approximately 58% of net sales to Dell for the six months ended July 4, 2009 and approximately 18% of net sales to Dell for the six months ended June 28, 2008.

 

Key Business Metrics

 

The following describes certain line items in our consolidated statements of operations that are important to management’s assessment of our financial performance:

 

Net Sales.   Net sales consist primarily of sales of our high performance memory subsystems, net of a provision for estimated returns under our right of return policies, which generally range up to 30 days. We generally do not have long-term sales agreements with our customers. Although OEM customers typically provide us with non-binding forecasts of future product demand over specific periods of time, they generally place orders with us approximately two weeks in advance of scheduled delivery. Selling prices are typically negotiated monthly, based on competitive market conditions and the current price of DRAM ICs and NAND. Purchase orders generally have no cancellation or rescheduling penalty provisions. We often ship our products to our customers’ international manufacturing sites. All of our sales to date, however, are denominated in US dollars. We also sell excess component inventory of DRAM ICs and NAND to distributors and other users of memory ICs. As compared to previous years, component inventory sales have significantly decreased as a percentage of net sales as a result of our efforts to diversify both our customer and product line bases. This diversification effort has also allowed us to use components in a wider range of memory subsystems. We expect that component inventory sales will continue to represent a minimal portion of our net sales in future periods.

 

Cost of Sales.   Our cost of sales includes the cost of materials, manufacturing costs, depreciation and amortization of equipment, inventory valuation provisions, stock-based compensation and occupancy costs and other allocated fixed costs. The DRAM ICs and NAND incorporated into our products constitute a significant portion of our cost of sales, and thus our cost of sales will fluctuate based on the current price of DRAM ICs and NAND. We attempt to pass through such DRAM IC and NAND cost fluctuations to our customers by frequently renegotiating pricing prior to the placement of their purchase orders. To the extent we are successful, a large majority of our product cost is variable, and thus our cost of sales and gross margin percentages may not be significantly impacted by changes in sales volume. However, the sales prices of our memory subsystems can also fluctuate due to competitive situations unrelated to the pricing of DRAM ICs and NAND, which affects gross margins. The gross margin on our sales of excess component DRAM IC and NAND inventory is much lower than the gross margin on our sales of our memory subsystems. As a result, a decrease in DRAM IC and NAND inventory sales as a percentage of our overall sales could result in an improved overall gross margin. We assess the valuation of our inventories on a monthly basis and record a provision to cost of sales as necessary to reduce inventories to the lower of cost or net realizable value.

 

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Research and Development.   Research and development expense consists primarily of employee and independent contractor compensation and related costs, stock-based compensation, computer-aided design software licenses, reference design development costs, patent-related fees, depreciation or rental of evaluation equipment, and occupancy and other allocated overhead costs. Also included in research and development expense are the costs of material and overhead related to the production of engineering samples of new products under development or products used solely in the research and development process. Our customers typically do not separately compensate us for design and engineering work involved in developing application-specific products for them. All research and development costs are expensed as incurred. We anticipate that research and development expenditures will increase in future periods as we seek to expand new product opportunities, increase our activities related to new and emerging markets and continue to develop additional proprietary technologies.

 

Selling, General and Administrative.   Selling, general and administrative expenses consist primarily of employee salaries and related costs, stock-based compensation, independent sales representative commissions, professional services, promotional and other selling and marketing expenses, and occupancy and other allocated overhead costs. A significant portion of our selling efforts is directed at building relationships with OEMs and other customers and working through the product approval and qualification process with them. Therefore, the cost of material and overhead related to products manufactured for qualification is included in selling expenses. As we continue to service existing and establish new customers, we anticipate that our sales and marketing expenses will increase. Since the beginning of fiscal 2009, we have been subject to attestation services requirements with respect to our internal control over financial reporting, the result of which will increase our legal and accounting expenses in future periods.

 

Provision (Benefit) for Income Taxes.   Under Accounting Principles Board Opinion No. 28, Interim Financial Reporting , we are required to adjust our effective tax rate each quarter to be consistent with the estimated annual effective tax rate.  We are also  required to record the tax impact of certain discrete items, unusual or infrequently occurring, including changes in judgment about valuation allowances and effects of changes in tax laws or rates, in the interim period in which they occur.  In addition, jurisdictions with a projected loss for the year or a year-to-date loss where no tax benefit can be recognized are excluded from the estimated annual effective tax rate.  The impact of such an exclusion could result in a higher or lower effective tax rate during a particular quarter, based upon the mix and timing of actual earnings versus annual projections.

 

In accordance with Statements of Financial Accounting Standards No. 109, Accounting for Income Taxes , we evaluate whether a valuation allowance should be established against its deferred tax assets based on the consideration of all available evidence using a “more likely than not” standard.

 

As of July 4, 2009, we have provided a full valuation allowance and no benefit has been recognized for net operating losses and other deferred tax assets due to uncertainty of future utilization.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S. requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of net sales and expenses during the reporting period. By their nature, these estimates and assumptions are subject to an inherent degree of uncertainty. We base our estimates on our historical experience, knowledge of current conditions and our beliefs of what could occur in the future considering available information. We review our estimates on an on-going basis. Actual results may differ from these estimates, which may result in material adverse effects on our operating results and financial position. We believe the following critical accounting policies involve the more significant assumptions and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements:

 

Revenue Recognition. We recognize revenues in accordance with the SEC’s Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 104, Revenue Recognition , or SAB 104. Under the provisions of SAB 104, we recognize revenues when there is persuasive evidence that an arrangement, product delivery and acceptance have occurred, the sales price is fixed or determinable, and collectibility of the resulting receivable is reasonably assured.

 

We generally use customer purchase orders and/or contracts as evidence of an arrangement. Delivery occurs when goods are shipped for customers with FOB Shipping Point terms and upon receipt for customers with FOB Destination terms, at which time title and risk of loss transfer to the customer. Shipping documents are used to verify delivery and customer acceptance. We assess whether the sales price is fixed or determinable based on the payment terms associated with the transaction and whether the sales price is subject to refund.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Customers are generally allowed limited rights of return for up to 30 days, except for sales of excess inventories, which contain no right-of-return privileges. Estimated returns are provided for at the time of sale based on historical experience or specific identification of an event necessitating a reserve. We offer a standard product warranty to our customers and have no other post-shipment obligations. While these returns have historically been within our expectations and the provisions established, we cannot guarantee that we will continue to experience similar return rates in the future. Any significant increase in product failure rates and the resulting product returns could have a material adverse effect on our operating results for the period or periods in which such returns materialize.

 

We assess collectibility based on the creditworthiness of the customer as determined by credit checks and evaluations, as well as the customer’s payment history. A portion of our shipments are made to third party inventory warehouses, or hubs, and we recognize revenue when the inventory is pulled from the hub for use in production by the customer. We receive a report from the customer on a daily basis indicating the inventories pulled from a hub for use by the customer, and perform a daily reconciliation of inventories shipped to and pulled by the customer to those inventories reflected on the customer’s reports to ensure that sales are recognized in the appropriate periods. We have historically had good visibility into the inventories on-hand at hub locations and also what our customers intend to pull within each reporting period. However, if a customer does not pull our inventory from its hub in accordance with the schedule it originally provided to us, our predicted future revenues could vary from our forecasts and our results of operations could be materially and adversely affected. Additionally, since we own inventories that are physically located in hubs, our ability to effectively manage inventory levels may be impaired, causing our inventory turns to decrease, which would increase expenses associated with excess and obsolete inventories and negatively impact our cash flow.

 

All amounts billed to customers related to shipping and handling are classified as net sales, while all costs incurred by us for shipping and handling are classified as cost of sales.

 

Warranty Reserve. We offer warranties on our memory subsystems generally ranging from one to three years, depending on the product and negotiated terms of purchase agreements with our customers. Such warranties require us to repair or replace defective product returned to us during the warranty period at no cost to the customer. Our estimates for warranty-related costs are recorded at the time of sale based on historical and estimated future product return rates and expected repair or replacement costs. While such costs have historically been within our expectations and the provisions established, unexpected changes in failure rates could have a material adverse impact on us, requiring additional warranty reserves, and adversely affecting our gross profit and gross margins.

 

Accounts Receivable. We perform credit evaluations of our customers’ financial condition and limit the amount of credit extended to our customers as deemed necessary, but generally require no collateral. We continuously monitor collections and payments from our customers and maintain a provision for estimated credit losses based upon our historical experience and any specific customer collection issues that we have identified. Generally, these credit losses have been within our expectations and the provisions established. However, we cannot guarantee that we will continue to experience credit loss rates similar to those we have experienced in the past.

 

Our accounts receivable are highly concentrated among a small number of customers, and a significant change in the liquidity or financial position of one of these customers could have a material adverse effect on the collectibility of our accounts receivable, our liquidity and our future operating results.

 

Inventories. We value our inventories at the lower of the actual cost to purchase or manufacture the inventory or the net realizable value of the inventory. Cost is determined on an average cost basis which approximates actual cost on a first-in, first-out basis and includes raw materials, labor and manufacturing overhead. We regularly review inventory quantities on hand and on order and record a provision for excess and obsolete inventories based primarily on our estimated forecast of product demand and production requirements for the next three to six months. In addition, we consider changes in the market value of DRAM ICs and NAND in determining the net realizable value of our raw material inventory. Once established, any write downs are considered permanent adjustments to the cost basis of our inventories. A significant decrease in demand for our products could result in an increase in the amount of excess inventory quantities on hand. In addition, our estimates of future product demand may prove to be inaccurate, in which case we may have understated or overstated the provision required for excess and obsolete inventory. In the future, if our inventories are determined to be overvalued, we would be required to recognize additional expense in our cost of sales at the time of such determination. Likewise, if our inventories are determined to be undervalued, we may have over-reported our costs of sales in previous periods and would be required to recognize additional gross profit at the time such inventories are sold. In addition, should the market value of DRAM ICs and NAND decrease significantly, we may be required to lower our selling prices to reflect the lower cost of our raw materials. If such price decreases reduce the net realizable value of our inventories to less than our cost, we would be required to recognize additional expense in our cost of sales in the same period. Although we make every reasonable effort to ensure the accuracy of our forecasts of future product demand, any significant unanticipated changes in demand, technological developments or the market value of DRAM ICs and NAND could have a material effect on the value of our inventories and our reported operating results.

 

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Long-Lived Assets. We review the recoverability of the carrying value of long-lived assets on an annual basis or whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Recoverability of these assets is determined based upon the forecasted undiscounted future net cash flows from the operations to which the assets relate, utilizing our best estimates, appropriate assumptions and projections at the time. These projected future cash flows may vary significantly over time as a result of increased competition, changes in technology, fluctuations in demand, consolidation of our customers and reductions in average selling prices. If the carrying value is determined not to be recoverable from future operating cash flows, the asset is deemed impaired and an impairment loss is recognized to the extent the carrying value exceeds the estimated fair market value of the asset.

 

Stock-Based Compensation. We account for equity issuances to non-employees in accordance with Emerging Issues Task Force Issue No. 96-18, Accounting for Equity Instruments that are Issued to Other Than Employees for Acquiring, or in Conjunction with Selling, Goods and Services . All transactions in which goods or services are the consideration received for the issuance of equity instruments are accounted for based on the fair value of the consideration received or the fair value of the equity instrument issued, whichever is more reliably measurable. The measurement date used to determine the fair value of the equity instrument issued is the earlier of the date on which the third-party performance is complete or the date on which it is probable that performance will occur.

 

On January 1, 2006, we adopted Statements of Financial Accounting Standards, or SFAS, No. 123R, Share-Based Payment , (“SFAS 123R”), which requires the measurement and recognition of compensation expense for all stock-based payment awards made to our employees and directors based on estimated fair values.

 

We currently use the Black-Scholes option pricing model to estimate the fair value of our common stock option awards. While this model meets the requirements of SFAS 123R, the estimated fair values generated by it may not be indicative of the actual fair values of these awards as it does not consider certain factors important to those awards to employees, such as continued employment and periodic vesting requirements as well as limited transferability. The Black-Scholes model requires subjective assumptions regarding future stock price volatility and expected time to exercise, along with assumptions about the risk-free interest rate and expected dividends, all of which affect the estimated fair values of our common stock option awards. The expected term of options granted is derived from historical data on employee exercises and post-vesting employment termination behavior. The expected volatility is based on the historical volatilities of the common stock of comparable publicly traded companies based on our belief that we currently have limited historical data regarding the volatility of our stock price on which to base a meaningful estimate of expected volatility. The risk-free rate selected to value any particular grant is based on the US Treasury rate that corresponds to the expected term of the grant effective as of the date of the grant. The expected dividends assumption is based on our history and expectation of dividend payouts. We evaluate the assumptions used to value our common stock option awards on a quarterly basis. If factors change and we employ different assumptions, stock-based compensation expense may differ significantly from what we have recorded in prior periods.

 

The value of the portion of stock-based awards that are ultimately expected to vest is recognized as expense over the requisite service periods in our consolidated financial statements. Given that stock-based compensation expense recognized in our consolidated financial statements is based on awards ultimately expected to vest, it has been reduced for estimated forfeitures. SFAS 123R requires forfeitures to be estimated at the time of grant and revised, if necessary, in subsequent periods if actual forfeitures differ from those estimates. If there are any modifications or cancellations of the underlying unvested stock-based awards, we may be required to accelerate, increase or cancel any remaining unearned stock-based compensation expense. Future stock-based compensation expense and unearned stock-based compensation will increase to the extent that we grant additional common stock options or other stock-based awards.

 

Income Taxes. Under Accounting Principles Board Opinion No. 28, Interim Financial Reporting , we are required to adjust our effective tax rate each quarter to be consistent with the estimated annual effective tax rate. We are also required to record the tax impact of certain discrete items, unusual or infrequently occurring, including changes in judgment about valuation allowances and effects of changes in tax laws or rates, in the interim period in which they occur. In addition, jurisdictions with a projected loss for the year, or a year-to-date loss where no tax benefit can be recognized, are excluded from our estimated annual effective tax rate. The impact of excluding these items could result in a higher or lower effective tax rate during a particular quarter, based upon the mix and timing of actual earnings versus annual projections.

 

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Table of Contents

 

We recognize deferred tax assets and liabilities based on the differences between the financial statement carrying values and the tax bases of assets and liabilities. We regularly review our deferred tax assets for recoverability and establish a valuation allowance, when determined necessary, based on historical taxable income, projected future taxable income, and the expected timing of the reversals of existing temporary differences. If we operate at a loss for an extended period of time or are unable to generate sufficient future taxable income, or if there is a material change in the actual effective tax rates or time period within which the underlying temporary differences become taxable or deductible, we could be required to record a valuation allowance against all or a significant portion of our deferred tax assets which could substantially increase our effective tax rate for such period. Any significant changes in statutory tax rates or the amount of our valuation allowance could have a material effect on the value of our deferred tax assets and liabilities, and our reported financial results. In the future, if we realize a deferred tax asset that currently carries a valuation allowance, we may record a reduction to income tax expense in the period of such realization.

 

We adopted Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, Interpretation No. 48, Accounting for Uncertainty in Income Taxes—An Interpretation of FASB Statement No. 109 , or FIN 48, on December 31, 2006, the first day of fiscal 2007. FIN 48 seeks to reduce the diversity in practice associated with certain aspects of measurement and recognition in accounting for income taxes. FIN 48 prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement requirement for the financial statement recognition of a tax position that has been taken or is expected to be taken on a tax return and also provides guidance on de-recognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure, and transition. Under FIN 48 we may only recognize or continue to recognize tax positions that meet a “more likely than not” threshold.

 

The application of tax laws and regulations is subject to legal and factual interpretation, judgment and uncertainty. Tax laws and regulations themselves are subject to change as a result of changes in fiscal policy, changes in legislation, the evolution of regulations and court rulings. Therefore, the actual liability for US. or foreign taxes may be materially different from our estimates, which could result in the need to record additional tax liabilities or potentially reverse previously recorded tax liabilities.

 

Results of Operations

 

The following table sets forth certain consolidated statements of operations data as a percentage of net sales for the periods indicated:

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

2009

 

2008

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

100

%

100

%

100

%

100

%

Cost of sales

 

92

 

86

 

105

 

82

 

Gross profit (loss)

 

8

 

14

 

(5

)

18

 

Operating expenses:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

64

 

9

 

68

 

10

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

67

 

18

 

76

 

21

 

Total operating expenses

 

131

 

27

 

144

 

32

 

Operating loss

 

(123

)

(13

)

(149

)

(14

)

Other income:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income, net

 

1

 

1

 

2

 

1

 

Other income (expense), net

 

(2

)

 

2

 

 

Total other income (expense), net

 

(1

)

1

 

4

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss before provision (benefit) for income taxes

 

(124

)

(12

)

(145

)

(13

)

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

 

1

 

 

1

 

(4

)

Net loss

 

(125

)%

(12

)%

(146

)%

(9

)%

 

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Three and Six Months Ended July 4, 2009 Compared to Three and Six Months Ended June 28, 2008

 

Net Sales, Cost of Sales and Gross Profit

 

The following table presents net sales, cost of sales and gross profit for the three and six months ended July 4, 2009 and June 28, 2008 (in thousands, except percentages):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

Increase

 

%

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

(Decrease)

 

Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

3,173

 

$

18,429

 

$

(15,256

)

(83

)%

Cost of sales

 

2,929

 

15,770

 

(12,841

)

(81

)%

Gross profit

 

$

244

 

$

2,659

 

$

(2,415

)

(91

)%

Gross margin

 

8

%

14

%

(7

)%

 

 

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

Increase

 

%

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

(Decrease)

 

Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net sales

 

$

5,335

 

$

31,533

 

$

(26,198

)

(83

)%

Cost of sales

 

5,628

 

25,743

 

(20,115

)

(78

)%

Gross profit (loss)

 

$

(293

)

$

5,790

 

$

(6,083

)

(105

)%

Gross margin

 

(5

)%

18

%

(24

)%

 

 

 

Net Sales.  The overall decrease in our net sales was primarily driven by a sharp reduction in demand from our current customer base, mainly due to the commodization of current product offerings in the past year.  We continue to transition to a new business strategy focused on the development of high-margin subsystems based on custom logic devices.

 

The decrease in net sales for the three months ended July 4, 2009 as compared to the three months ended June 28, 2008 resulted primarily from decreases of approximately (i) $4.2 million in sales of laptop personal computer memory subsystems, and (ii) $11.2 million in sales of our high density server modules.

 

The decrease in net sales for the six months ended July 4, 2009 as compared to the six months ended June 28, 2008 resulted primarily from decreases of approximately (i) $17.3 million in net sales of certain high density memory modules for the server market and related applications, (ii) $3.2 million in net sales of memory subsystems used to control RAIDs and (iii) $6.1 million in net sales of laptop personal computer memory subsystems.

 

Sales of our component inventory to distributors and other users of memory ICs represented approximately 2% and 1% of net sales for the three months ended July 4, 2009 and June 28, 2008, respectively, and approximately 2% and 1% of net sales for the six months ended July 4, 2009 and June 28, 2008, respectively. As compared to previous years, component inventory sales have significantly decreased as a percentage of net sales as a result of our efforts to diversify our customer base, which has resulted in our ability to use components in a wider range of memory subsystems.

 

Gross (Loss) Profit and Gross Margin.  Gross (loss) profit for the three and six months ended July 4, 2009 as compared to the three and six months ended June 28, 2008 decreased primarily due to the 83% decrease in net sales between the two periods. The decrease in gross margin for the three months ended July 4, 2009 as compared to the three months ended June 28, 2008 is mainly due to the inability to absorb manufacturing costs caused by the significant drop in units manufactured and sold during the most recent quarter.  These decreases were partially offset by a shift in product mix toward higher margin contributing products.  The decrease in gross margin for the six months ended July 4, 2009 as compared to the six months ended June 28, 2008 of 24% is mostly due to unused capacity in our manufacturing facility, partially offset by an increase in product margin of 11% due to the change in product mix and customer base during the period.

 

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Table of Contents

 

Research and Development .

 

The following table presents research and development expenses for the three and six months ended July 4, 2009 and June 28, 2008 (in thousands, except percentages):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

Increase

 

Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

$

2,030

 

$

1,716

 

$

314

 

18

%

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

Increase

 

Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Research and development

 

$

3,644

 

$

3,292

 

$

352

 

11

%

 

The increase in research and development expense in the three months ended July 4, 2009 as compared to the three months ended June 28, 2008 resulted primarily from increases of (i) $0.6 million in personnel-related expenses as a result of an increase in the number of outside contractors engaged in research and development activities during the second quarter of 2009 and (ii) $0.1 million in legal and professional fees as we continue to increase activities related to new and emerging markets in 2009. The above increases were offset by a decrease of approximately $0.5 million in expenses related to product qualification builds and testing.

 

The increase in research and development expense in the six months ended July 4, 2009 as compared to the six months ended June 28, 2008 resulted primarily from increases of approximately (i) $0.9 million in personnel-related expenses as a result of an increase in the number of outside contractors engaged in research and development activities and (ii) $0.3 million in legal and professional fees as we continue to increase activities related to new and emerging markets. The above increases were offset by a decrease of approximately $0.9 million in expenses related to product qualification builds and testing.

 

Selling, General and Administrative .

 

The following table presents selling, general and administrative expenses for the three and six months ended July 4, 2009 and June 28, 2008 (in thousands, except percentages):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

Decrease

 

Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

$

2,120

 

$

3,310

 

$

(1,190

)

(36

)%

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

Decrease

 

Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Selling, general and administrative

 

$

4,055

 

$

6,778

 

$

(2,723

)

(40

)%

 

The decrease in selling, general and administrative expense for the three months ended July 4, 2009 as compared to the three months ended June 28, 2008 resulted primarily from decreases of (i) $0.8 million in personnel-related expenses primarily attributable to a decrease in the number of employees and outside contractors engaged in selling, general and administrative functions of approximately 51% during the 2009 quarter as compared to the 2008 quarter , (ii) $0.1 million in commission expenses due to a decline in sales revenue during the most recent quarter, (iii) $0.2 million in product qualification expense and related travel costs as a result of a decrease in the number of sales personnel during the most recent quarter.

 

The decrease in selling, general and administrative expense in the six months ended July 4, 2009 as compared to the six months ended June 28, 2008 resulted primarily from decreases of approximately (i) $1.7 million in personnel-related expenses, (ii) $0.3 million in legal and professional fees, (iii) $0.2 million in commission and travel-related expenses and (iv) $0.5 million in product qualification, evaluation and advertising.

 

27



Table of Contents

 

Other Income (Expense) .

 

The following table presents other income (expense) for the three and six months ended July 4, 2009 and June 28, 2008 (in thousands, except percentages):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

Increase

 

%

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

(Decrease)

 

Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income, net

 

$

18

 

$

104

 

$

(86

)

(83

)%

Other income (expense), net

 

(45

)

23

 

(68

)

(296

)%

Total other income (expense), net

 

$

(27

)

$

127

 

$

(154

)

(121

)%

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

Increase

 

%

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

(Decrease)

 

Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Interest income, net

 

$

100

 

$

343

 

$

(243

)

(71

)%

Other income (expense), net

 

$

130

 

$

(68

)

198

 

(291

)%

Total other income (expense), net

 

$

230

 

$

275

 

$

(45

)

(16

)%

 

Net interest income for the three and six months ended July 4, 2009 was comprised of interest income of approximately $0.01 million and $0.04 million, respectively, offset by interest expense of approximately $0.01 million and $0.02 million, respectively.  Net interest income for the three and six months ended June 28, 2008 was comprised of interest income of approximately $0.2 million and $0.5 million, respectively, partially offset by interest expense of approximately $0.1 million and $0.2 million, respectively.  The decrease in interest income in the three and six months ended July 4, 2009 as compared to the three and six months ended June 28, 2008 was due to a combination of our lower overall cash and investment balances and the decrease in the yield earned on those balances due to lower interest rates.  The decrease in interest expense during 2009 as compared to 2008 resulted primarily from our lower average outstanding balances on our line of credit and debt balances during the current year.

 

Other income (expense), net, for the six months ended July 4, 2009 is primarily comprised of gains from the sale of equipment held for sale during the first quarter.  Other expense, net, for the three and six months ended June 28, 2008 is primarily comprised of losses on certain foreign currency remeasurement transactions, partially offset by realized gains on the sale of certain investments in marketable securities.

 

Provision (Benefit) for Income Taxes .

 

The following table presents the provision (benefit) for income taxes for the three and six months ended July 4, 2009 and June 28, 2008 (in thousands, except percentages):

 

 

 

Three Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

Increase

 

Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Provision for income taxes

 

$

31

 

$

11

 

$

20

 

182

%

Effective tax rate

 

1

%

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Six Months Ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

July 4,

 

June 28,

 

 

 

%

 

 

 

2009

 

2008

 

Decrease

 

Change

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Provision (benefit) for income taxes

 

$

49

 

$

(1,170

)

$

1,219

 

(104

)%

Effective tax rate

 

1

%